The colour on your display is crucial here for identifying a brush and logs. Because they will send a different frequency of sonar return, your fish finder will show them in a different color to the bottom (otherwise, it will just look like a hump). So make sure you choose a color palette that will highlight this difference. In the Deeper App, choose either the Classic color mode (where brush and logs will show green, like vegetation) or the Day color mode (where they will show purple).
Winter weather may run us inside, but that doesn't mean the sport sleeps. Those "other things" I mentioned will be covered when I write my book, but for now they will have to wait. In the mean time, let's discuss some other "deep thoughts". Or should that be "thoughts about the deep"? Or maybe it would be "I thought this water was deeper". This article is about depth finders, or more commonly called "fish finders". In this issue, we'll discuss your options when it comes to selecting one of these gadgets, along with tips for temporary or permanent installation.
Points are more gradual than drop offs, but spotting them is just as easy (see the screen shot below). Make sure you maintain a steady speed when trolling or reeling so you get an accurate reading on how steep the incline is. You should scan with a narrow sonar beam to get the clearest reading, and to ensure you see any shelfs or humps which wider beam scanning might not pick up (our page onhow sonars workexplains why this is).
LCD displays are made of a grid of “picture elements,” tiny dots that individually darken when electrical current is applied, with their name shortened in common usage to “pixel.” More vertical pixels mean higher depth resolution, as each pixel represents less depth. The number of pixels in a screen’s horizontal axis determines how long objects stay onscreen before they scroll out of view, of significant importance with split-screen displays showing narrow columns of side-by-side information.
The term tackle, with the meaning "apparatus for fishing", has been in use from 1398 AD.[1] Fishing tackle is also called fishing gear. However the term fishing gear is more usually used in the context of commercial fishing, whereas fishing tackle is more often used in the context of recreational fishing. This article covers equipment used by recreational anglers.
As we mentioned, the strength of a fish finder is in how well it can locate the fish, which is why you need a high-quality transducer. CHIRP technology is one of the best you can find, and it provides a 200-watt RMS signal that can reach down to 1,600 feet in fresh water and 750 feet in salt water. Overall, you can find plenty of fish with this device.

The use of the hook in angling is descended, historically, from what would today be called a "gorge". The word "gorge", in this context, comes from an archaic word meaning "throat". Gorges were used by ancient peoples to capture fish. A gorge was a long, thin piece of bone or stone attached by its midpoint to a thin line. The gorge would be fixed with a bait so that it would rest parallel to the lay of the line. When a fish swallowed the bait, a tug on the line caused the gorge to orient itself at right angles to the line, thereby sticking in the fish's gullet.
Fully Networkable, 8” Touchscreen Chartplotter and Sonar. Garmin’s GPSMAP 7608xsv includes built in maps for Coastal and Lake mapping, a 10HZ GPS Receiver providing fast acquisition and position tracking. High Performance HD-ID Sonar, 1kW CHIRP, CHIRP DownVu and CHIRP SideVu. Now enjoy FLIR Camera Compatibility, Smart Boundaries and More. Transducer Required and Sold Separately.
Hand nets are held open by a hoop, and maybe on the end of a long stiff handle. They have been known since antiquity and may be used for sweeping up fish near the water surface like muskellunge and northern pike. When such a net is used by an angler to help land a fish it is known as a landing net.[12] In the UK, hand-netting is the only legal way of catching glass eels[13] and has been practised for thousands of years on the River Parrett and River Severn.
PERMANENT INSTALLATION: I say an installation is permanent once you start drilling holes. A permanent installation will require you to provide power/wiring, physically mount the transducer, and mount the fish finder itself. A few years ago, these things were a lot tougher to do - similar to baking a cake from scratch. I don't like the notion of "trial and error" when I have a drill in my hand. But now that our sport has become more mainstream, products are being offered specifically for kayaks, and fish finder installation can be so easy, even Betty Crocker could do it.
Fish finders were derived from fathometers, active sonar instruments used for navigation and safety to determine the depth of water.[1] The fathom is a unit of water depth, from which the instrument gets its name. The fathometer is an echo sounding system for measurement of water depth. A fathometer will display water depth and can make an automatic permanent record of measurements. Since both fathometers and fishfinders work the same way, and use similar frequencies and can detect both the bottom and fish, the instruments have merged.[2]
When it comes to fish finders and fishing GPS technology, the HELIX 5 delivers some of the best in functionality and creating a seamless user experience for fishing pros and hobbyists. This unit uses precise broadband CHIRP, a Reflex interface, imaging sonar and the power to chart and create maps using Auto Chart Live. The HELIX 5 has taken what is already a premier fish finder tool, and taken it to new heights in terms of features and creating an even better user interface. The display looks rich and clear, and is powered with 4,000 watts of PTP power output.

The image to the right shows a school of white bass aggressively feeding on a school of threadfin shad. Note the school of baitfish near the bottom. When threatened, baitfish form a tightly packed school, as the individuals seek safety in the center of the school. This typically looks like an irregularly shaped ball or thumbprint on the fishfinder screen. When no predators are nearby, a school of baitfish frequently appears as a thin horizontal line across the screen, at the depth where the temperature and oxygen levels are optimal. The nearly-vertical lines near the right edge of the screen show the path of fishing lures falling to the bottom.

Higher frequencies, such as 192 or 200, are ideal for fishing in shallow water. Lower frequencies, such as 50 or 83, are perfect for deep water fishing. To find the top fish finder for the money, knowing what area you’re planning on using it in will lead to more catches. Remember that the higher the frequency, the more detail you’ll have on the screen.
It’s no secret that HDS displays are used by more tournament fishing pros than all other fishfinding brands combined, so we didn’t have to go back to the drawing board to build it; we just made the best fishfinder/chartplotter in the world even better. HDS LIVE  delivers premium performance and support for the best collection of innovative sonar features available – from Active Imaging™, StructureScan® 3D, FishReveal™ and LiveSight™ sonar, to exciting navigation functionality like C-MAP® Genesis Live mapping – all designed to help you find more fish.
Simrad’s GO9 XSE Combination GPS/ Fishfinder offers a networkable 9” Touchscreen unit at an affordable price point. An Internal 10Hz GPS Receiver quickly and accurately locates position on the included C-Map Pro Charting while the included TotalScan Transom Mount Transducer provides detailed underwater images. Compatible with detailed mapping from C-MAP MAX-N, Navionics, Insight, Insight Genesis, and NV Digital Charts.
If you’ve used a fish finder before, then you might be wondering why it’s necessary to get one with a GPS. To be perfectly honest, if you are someone who likes to fish in your local area and either casts from the shore or the back of a small boat, then GPS capability may not be something that’s worthwhile. However, for any fisherman who likes to go searching for the best catch, having GPS installed on your finder can make a world of difference. Here are some of the best reasons to get the  best GPS combo fish locator.
The term tackle, with the meaning "apparatus for fishing", has been in use from 1398 AD.[1] Fishing tackle is also called fishing gear. However the term fishing gear is more usually used in the context of commercial fishing, whereas fishing tackle is more often used in the context of recreational fishing. This article covers equipment used by recreational anglers.
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