Fish icons are a useful tool when you are getting started with a sonar device: your fish finder interprets the sonar data it receives and tries to work out if it is a fish or not. It does this based on factors like the size of the object and the strength of the sonar return. In the case of Deeper sonars, we use an advanced algorithm in the Deeper App to interpret the data. Unfortunately, even the most advanced units aren’t 100% accurate in interpreting correctly.
Look for equipment that will work with multiple frequency: higher for better detail but not as successful in deep water; lower for depth but less detail on your viewing screen. Of course, if you fish only in shallow water, you’ll be happier with high-frequency output. For deep-water work and for commercial fishing, you may want to use a lower frequency.

Ultrasound frequency used by a fish finder generally ranges from 15 kHz to 200 kHz. However, the majority of the conventional fish finders oriented for recreational craft utilize 50 kHz and 200 kHz. Such fish finders available in the market incorporate electronic circuitry that can transmit and receive ultrasound in these two frequencies. Also, a transducer mounted on the bottom of the craft is configured to handle these two frequencies.
The depth scale on the right of the screen enables you to identify the depth of any features you find. The depth reading in the top right of the screen shows you the bottom depth under your fish finder right now – bear in mind this is not necessarily the same depth as the features you have just scanned, especially if you are scanning drop offs or points.
The depth scale on the right of the screen enables you to identify the depth of any features you find. The depth reading in the top right of the screen shows you the bottom depth under your fish finder right now – bear in mind this is not necessarily the same depth as the features you have just scanned, especially if you are scanning drop offs or points.
Fly fishing tackle is equipment used by, and often specialised for use by fly anglers. Fly fishing tackle includes fly lines designed for easy casting, specialised fly reels designed to hold a fly line and supply drag if required for landing heavy or fast fish, specialised fly rods designed to cast fly lines and artificial flies, terminal tackle including artificial flies, and other accessories including fly boxes used to store and carry artificial flies.

Paddling.net has always given me plenty of room to not only discuss paddle fishing things, but other worldly things as well. So, with colder weather upon us and fewer fishing opportunities available, I figured I might as well take full advantage of that luxury and devote an installment to those "other" things. You know, like politics, religion/faith (the huge difference between them), family, crime/punishment, and why Kiss still isn't in the rock and roll hall of fame.


Screen Color & Resolution is an essential factor in your selection. Color screens are the new norm on today’s fish finders. A color screen enables you to more easily decipher objects in the water, giving you valuable insight into your game fish. Also consider the amount of pixels on your screen—the more pixels, the greater level of detail you can see. LED backlit screens provide brilliant visual display, particularly for fishing in low-light conditions.
Now let’s imagine another scenario – again your sonar is stationary, but this time 2 fish swim through your sonar beam, one big and one small. The big fish swims very quickly through the sonar beam, the small one swims slowly. Which one will make the longer fish arch on your screen? The answer is the small one. That’s because a slow moving object will leave a longer mark than a fast moving one, whatever their size.
The term tackle, with the meaning "apparatus for fishing", has been in use from 1398 AD.[1] Fishing tackle is also called fishing gear. However the term fishing gear is more usually used in the context of commercial fishing, whereas fishing tackle is more often used in the context of recreational fishing. This article covers equipment used by recreational anglers.
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