THE LIMBO: How low can you go? Or, how low do you need to go? This is an important question you need to answer. If you don't need to see what's 1000 feet below you, they you can certainly save yourself some money. You did save the gift receipts for those much_appreciated_but_unwanted Christmas gifts, didn't you? Before we take the drill off the charger, let's ponder some options and then work backwards to determine what your needs/wants/limitations are.
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While many fish finders point directly underneath your boat, higher end units like this one will sweep to the sides as well. Considering that you are casting out from the ship rather than dangling lines beneath it, side sweeping is much more valuable as it allows you to find fish wherever you are, rather than finding them, moving the boat, and then trying to catch them.
The intensity of the sonar return from a hard bottom will be different to one from a hard bottom. Your fish finder uses colour to show this difference. In the standard colour palette of the Deeper display, the colour varies from dull brown (softest) to intense orange (hardest). In the day mode colour palette (see screen shot), the difference is even easier to see, with the colour ranging from purple (softest) to red to orange to yellow (hardest).
We’re only slightly kidding when we say that one of the simplest ways to pick a transducer is to decide just how big of a hole you want to drill in your boat. Fishfinders intended for the small-boat, freshwater angler often come with a transducer, usually a transom-mount type. But many transducers are purchased separately and need to be installed through the hull.

Higher frequency transducers have shorter wavelengths and more wave cycles per second, which means you can visualize more details (smaller fish) but have only shallow to moderate depth capacity. One sound wave at 200kHz is slightly longer than 1/4", so a 200kHz sound wave will be able to detect fish as short as a quarter of an inch. A 200kHz transducer has a range of only about 600'. High frequency provides a crisp, clear picture of the bottom with the tradeoff of less depth range. For best resolution, choose 800kHz or 455kHz transducers.
The display is all about pixels. With more pixels you will be able to see more details, so it’s also an important factor to consider. More pixels also means higher price of the fish detector. We would suggest going minimum 240(v) x 160(h) pixels of the screen. However, this screen will give a pretty blocky image. To have a sharper image and better resolution, you will need to invest more.
As you look for a GPS/fishfinder combo, keep in mind that the best power and frequency won’t mean much if you can’t use the information. Think in terms of a computer. You can have the most-powerful and efficient computing capability, but without a high-quality monitor, the data does you little good. That’s why it’s always a good idea to spend a bit more to get a top-shelf screen.
The display is all about pixels. With more pixels you will be able to see more details, so it’s also an important factor to consider. More pixels also means higher price of the fish detector. We would suggest going minimum 240(v) x 160(h) pixels of the screen. However, this screen will give a pretty blocky image. To have a sharper image and better resolution, you will need to invest more.
While not every object will be as easy to distinguish, you can always get clues from the shape and also the strength of the sonar return. Notice the multiple orange sonar returns underneath the car – these tell you that this is a very hard object. The sonar scans have hit the car, bounced up to the surface of the water, bounced off the surface and hit the car again.
A fish finder is an incredible tool that can help take your sport or commercial fishing venture to the next level. However, even the best fish finders can use a little improvement – and adding a GPS is one way to do this.The best fishfinder GPS combo will help you navigate whatever body of water you are on at the same time as it allows you to find where to fish more quickly, accurately and efficiently.
Furthermore, Garmin’s fish finder also has a built-in CHIRP continuous sweep sonar that provides the widest range of sonar profile information available, allowing you to find and mark where the fish like to hide more accurately. Best of all though, the transducer on the 7SV offers “sideview” sonar for a clearer picture of what is around you and your boat while you are out on the water.
The best value fish finder models that we have listed above are the most popular in 2014. All of them have high fish finder ratings and predominantly positive reviews of the users. According to your needs, one model or other might be a better choice for you. When you compare fish finders, you should consider your budget and the features you would like the fish finder you are looking for to have. Before choosing fish finder, you need to decide do you need a portable unit or a fixed one for mounting onto your boat. Also consider will a fish finder be sufficient for your needs or do you also need an integral GPS in the unit. We hope that with the information that I have provided in this best fish finder reviews, you will find a fish finder that will help you catch more fish.
There are plenty of different things you want to keep in mind while searching for the perfect GPS fishfinder for you. First, keep in mind that not all models are created equal. Some will clearly be more useful than others. You will also find that different boats call for different fish finders. Many times ditto depending on the style of fishing or information most important to you.
Paddling.net has always given me plenty of room to not only discuss paddle fishing things, but other worldly things as well. So, with colder weather upon us and fewer fishing opportunities available, I figured I might as well take full advantage of that luxury and devote an installment to those "other" things. You know, like politics, religion/faith (the huge difference between them), family, crime/punishment, and why Kiss still isn't in the rock and roll hall of fame.
Modern rods are sophisticated casting tools fitted with line guides and a reel for line stowage. They are most commonly made of fibreglass, carbon fibre or, classically, bamboo. Fishing rods vary in action as well as length, and can be found in sizes between 24 inches and 20 feet. The longer the rod, the greater the mechanical advantage in casting. There are many different types of rods, such as fly rods, tenkara rods, spin and bait casting rods, spinning rods, ice rods, surf rods, sea rods and trolling rods.
The Garmin Striker 4 has all the features that one may desire when acquiring a fish finder and its low price makes it perhaps the best fish finder with GPS one is likely to find in the market. The advanced technology installed in the device will make the days one used to persevere without knowing whether they are going to catch anything seem outdated and very undesirable.
For deep-water fishermen, and those who spend much of their time angling in open water, a GPS is essential. When you are far from landmarks and familiar sight-lines, your chances of success can be much better when you can return to that favourite spot. Commercial-fishing pros understand this as well as anyone, which is why they invest in quality GPS equipment.
ONE SMALL STEP FOR MAN, ONE GIANT LEAP FOR PADDLING_KIND: In the 2009 ICAST article, I mentioned a combo system that was in the new products exhibit, but wasn't available at the time of the show. It's most certainly available now, and that unit is the Humminbird 385CI. Like us, fish seek comfort, safety, and food. This unit will allow you to gather "data" that you can process in to fish finding "information".
Simrad’s GO9 XSE Combination GPS/ Fishfinder offers a networkable 9” Touchscreen unit at an affordable price point. An Internal 10Hz GPS Receiver quickly and accurately locates position on the included C-Map Pro Charting while the included TotalScan Transom Mount Transducer provides detailed underwater images. Compatible with detailed mapping from C-MAP MAX-N, Navionics, Insight, Insight Genesis, and NV Digital Charts.
The temperature and pressure sensitivity capability of fish finder units allow one to identify the exact location of the fish in the water by the use of a temperature gauge.Functionality present in many modern fish finders also have track back capabilities in order to check the changes in movement in order to switch position and location whilst fishing.

Power output is measure in watts, often represented by the “W” symbol. With more power you’ll get clearer, more-accurate readings, and you’ll be able to find fish in deeper water. Units with limited power won’t always send the signal out far enough and you can get poor quality images. Look closely for a good power output and frequency options. The right combination can help you choose the right unit, based on overall ability. You’re looking for balance of depth, power and clarity of image.
Whatever species you are hunting, knowing the hardness of the lake bottom and its consistency is another key piece of knowledge when you are trying to crack the code and get the fish biting.There are 3 factors to consider when working out if the bottom displayed on your fish finder is hard or soft: bottom colour, bottom thickness, and the presence of a 2nd bottom return or not.
The image above, at right, clearly shows the bottom structure—plants, sediments and hard bottom are discernible on sonar plots of sufficiently high power and appropriate frequency. Slightly more than halfway up from the bottom to the left of the screen centre and about a third away from the left side, this image is also displaying a fish – a light spot just to the right of a 'glare' splash from the camera's flashbulb. The X-axis of the image represents time, oldest (and behind the soundhead) to the left, most recent bottom (and current location) on the right; thus the fish is now well behind the transducer, and the vessel is now passing over a dip in the ocean floor or has just left it behind. The resulting distortion depends on both the speed of the vessel and how often the image is updated by the echo sounder.

The power of a fishfinder—the strength of the “ping”—is expressed in watts RMS (root mean squared). Power is directly related to how well you see in silt-laden water, view down to greater depths, and successfully resolve separate targets and bottom structure. A 500-watt (RMS) fishfinder should have plenty of power for most coastal applications. Serious bluewater anglers should look for 1,000 watts or more. Inland lake fishermen can see the shallow bottom with only 200 watts.
If I'm scouting a new area I won't know anything about what sort of structure is ahead until I paddle over it, blowing out any fish that may have been there. With this little guy, I could cast it to the spot, get a read on what's below and proceed. And, you have the luxury of retrieving it slowly to see bottom contours between you and that fishy spot. There have been a number of occasions when I've made numerous casts at a fishy looking location (without any luck), only to paddle over there and discover that it was 10" deep, nobody home.
Raymarine’s DragonFly 4 PRO with Navionics Plus Mapping offers Dual-Channel Sonar with CHIRP DownView enabling easy identification of fish and underwater structure with photo-like images. Reaching depths of 600ft with CHIRP DownVision and 900ft with CHIRP Sonar the DragonFly 4 includes a built in GPS receiver and provides accurate coastal navigation data all on a 4.3” Color Display.
Now let’s imagine another scenario – again your sonar is stationary, but this time 2 fish swim through your sonar beam, one big and one small. The big fish swims very quickly through the sonar beam, the small one swims slowly. Which one will make the longer fish arch on your screen? The answer is the small one. That’s because a slow moving object will leave a longer mark than a fast moving one, whatever their size.
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Many people prefer to fish solely with lures, which are artificial baits designed to entice fish to strike. The artificial bait angler uses a man-made lure that may or may not represent prey. The lure may require a specialised presentation to impart an enticing action as, for example, in fly fishing. Recently, electronic lures have been developed to attract fish. Anglers have also begun using plastic bait. A common way to fish a soft plastic worm is the Texas rig.
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