Explore our collection of new fly-fishing gear and equipment. We carefully plan our designs and research every detail so you can maximize your fishing time and enjoy the best fishing gear money can buy. Discover the latest in a variety of fishing gear, including fly rods, fishing packs, waders, boats, wading boots, fly reels, and other gear. Let us help prepare you for your next fishing adventure—our selection of fishing gear has been engineered and tested by industry professionals to bring you only the best fishing products; shop with confidence knowing you're choosing from the best fly-fishing gear on the market.
Spend more time catching fish and less time trying to find where they are hiding with the Helix 7 CHIRP GPS G2 Fish finder. Using side-by-side dual imaging technology, this fish finder not only lets you map structures and schools, but also allows you to view both CHIRP Down Imaging and Switchfire Sonar data at the same time, providing the most complete image of the underwater environment possible. In addition to the large 16-bit display, the Helix 7 also features an integrated GPS that store up to 2500 waypoints and 50 routes so you can mark the coordinates of all the best fishing spots on your favorite lakes and rivers.
Big baits catch big fish, but this presents a problem for the ice angler. Hunting behemoth pike and muskies requires large, lively baits that do not play nice with tip-ups. Suckers and live trout are strong enough to trip the flag of almost any tip-up, causing you to waste time resetting lines after false alarms. Attaching a planer board clip to your tip-up to hold your main line will prevent even an 18-inch sucker from triggering a false flag. The added pressure of the clip, which can be adjusted, has enough tension to hold suckers and trout but still allow predators to pull the line free and run. The flag will trip when it matters, but the bait won’t have the strength to trip it by itself. Just snap the clip to the line guide of the tip-up under the spool. This will allow the planer board clip to hang freely under the water. Simply clip in the main line after setting the bait.
As with many products, you’ll have to pay close attention to the specific features delivered for the price, simply because the investment for combination fishfinder and GPS can range from $500 to $1200 or more. Fishfinders and GPS units are well advanced when compared to equipment used just a few years ago. Most of the time you can get excellent 3D mapping, scanning, charting and navigation at a very reasonable price. It’s not necessary to spend hundreds more unless you really want to go after the top-of-the-line unit.
These sonar reflections will also display on the screen. So this way a fishfinder reads and lets you view the bottom and everything it encounters in between. The angle of the sonar beam is measured in degrees and it’s called the cone angle. A wider angle covers more area underwater. Different fish detector models come with different cone angles. Some models also include multi-beam sonar technology that allows covering a much wider area.
The sound wave spreads as it gets further from the transducer. The wider the cone, the larger the coverage area, but the as the cone angle spreads, sensitivity diminishes. A 20-degree cone is considered a versatile angle for fishers who frequent different water depths. More advanced devices come with double and triple beams, ideal for scanning deep water depths.
Furthermore, all you need to do to integrate high quality maps and navigational data for any lake in your region is load up a microSD card with Humminbird’s Lake Master, Auto Chart, Auto Chart Pro and Navionics software suites and pop it right into the integrated SD card slot. Hummingbird’s unique software packages take the guesswork out of knowing where to fish and how deep the fish are currently swimming so you can better decide how to go about landing that trophy catch of a lifetime.
Understanding how a fish finder works will help you to understand how to use it. Fish finders work using sonar. It’s a technology that uses sound waves to display underwater objects. The fish finder produces the sound wave and with the transducer sends it through the water. Penetrating the water deeper, the sound wave starts to spread in the form of a cone (commonly called a beam). As the wave encounters objects within this beam, it sends the signal back to the transducer.

Commercial fishermen also make use of these characteristics. They conduct a search by low frequency (i.e., 15 kHz) beams first to grasp the general locations of fish schools around the boat. Subsequently, they narrow the search area for a fish school, using high frequency beams (200 kHz), to detect the exact location of the fish school and operate the boat to be directly above the targeted fish school.
For those who want the ultimate in fish finding technology, we have the Lowrance HDS-9 as a top rated fish finder. Not only do you get a large screen, but it’s touch activated for even more convenience. It’s so wide that you can chart two maps at once, and it’s all high-definition which allows you to create 3D models of the bottom of any lake or river in real time. Overall, this is as good as it gets.
Detection range (depth) of a fish finder depends upon the frequency used for ultrasound transmission. In principle, the higher the frequency of ultrasound, the shorter the propagation range can be. The wavelength of high frequency ultrasound is short, and its directivity angle is narrow, which enables detailed searches, but it attenuates significantly while travelling through water. Low frequency ultrasound is characterised by its long wavelength, wider directivity angle and high level of tolerance toward underwater attenuation, hence enabling wide-area-searches in deeper water. To summarize, you can choose low frequency if you are searching in deep water and high frequency if you are conducting a detailed search in shallow water. Further, when using low frequency ultrasound, you may be able to conduct more precise deep-water searches by adding an optional Power Adapter, which amplifies the transmitter power to a few kilowatts. Please note, however, that when using the Power Adapter, a dedicated transducer capable of handling higher transmitter power will be needed.

Now let’s imagine another scenario – again your sonar is stationary, but this time 2 fish swim through your sonar beam, one big and one small. The big fish swims very quickly through the sonar beam, the small one swims slowly. Which one will make the longer fish arch on your screen? The answer is the small one. That’s because a slow moving object will leave a longer mark than a fast moving one, whatever their size.


As you look for a GPS/fishfinder combo, keep in mind that the best power and frequency won’t mean much if you can’t use the information. Think in terms of a computer. You can have the most-powerful and efficient computing capability, but without a high-quality monitor, the data does you little good. That’s why it’s always a good idea to spend a bit more to get a top-shelf screen.
The depth scale on the right of the screen enables you to identify the depth of any features you find. The depth reading in the top right of the screen shows you the bottom depth under your fish finder right now – bear in mind this is not necessarily the same depth as the features you have just scanned, especially if you are scanning drop offs or points.

Moreover, the 7SV also has a built in Garmin GPS that allows you to make your own waypoint maps, which makes marking all those stumps, docks, and brush piles as easy as clicking a button or two. All map information is transferrable to other Garmin fish finder devices if you upgrade as well, adding even more versatility to the 7SV. Additionally, the 7SV also has its own rechargeable battery pack that helps you stay on the water all day long, thereby increasing your chances of finally reeling in that trophy catch you’ve been looking for all these years.


It terms of the functionality, the HDS-7 is able to connect to the internet to broadcast data, update to new software, upload information such as marked coordinates and more. This Lowrance model uses the latest of advanced technologies such as CHIRP sonar, Broadband sounder, StructureScan HD, DownScan imaging and Trackback view for the ultimate fish finding experience.

Thru-hull: This means a threaded bronze, nylon or stainless steel shaft passes through the bottom surface of the hull. You have several styles to choose from: external football-shaped head with water flow smoothed by a fairing block that also corrects for the dead rise (sideways slope of the hull); or round mushroom head thru-hulls, either semi-flush or flush mounted. These are the most challenging to install, but likely to provide the best signal quality. Displacement power and sailboats generally use thru-hulls.
Explore our collection of new fly-fishing gear and equipment. We carefully plan our designs and research every detail so you can maximize your fishing time and enjoy the best fishing gear money can buy. Discover the latest in a variety of fishing gear, including fly rods, fishing packs, waders, boats, wading boots, fly reels, and other gear. Let us help prepare you for your next fishing adventure—our selection of fishing gear has been engineered and tested by industry professionals to bring you only the best fishing products; shop with confidence knowing you're choosing from the best fly-fishing gear on the market.
Important parameters of a fishing line are its breaking strength and its diameter (thicker, sturdier lines are more visible to fish). Factors that may determine what line an angler chooses for a given fishing environment include breaking strength, diameter,castability, buoyancy, stretch, color, knot strength, UV resistance, limpness, abrasion resistance, and visibility.
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