The CHIRP sonar that is built into this model is second to none in terms of performance, and always gives you a clear picture and measurement of the floor and surface beneath your boat, as well as the location of the fish around it. Another feature that we really enjoy about this Humingbird fish finder is that it comes with a built in SD card slot so that you can save your favorite waypoints to it. You can even upload additional maps to your software using the SD card feature.
Paddling.net has always given me plenty of room to not only discuss paddle fishing things, but other worldly things as well. So, with colder weather upon us and fewer fishing opportunities available, I figured I might as well take full advantage of that luxury and devote an installment to those "other" things. You know, like politics, religion/faith (the huge difference between them), family, crime/punishment, and why Kiss still isn't in the rock and roll hall of fame.
2. Save numerous locations and data for accurate and successful fishing next time out – You navigate quickly and accurately to your top fishing spot, then save the locations so you can return to them later. Reduction in physical size has been accompanied by massive increases in computer memory, so you can have the information on numerous locations ready to use every time you go, no matter where you go.
Raymarine has a few units that come with a built in GPS. The Dragonfly 4Pro, Dragonfly 5Pro, and Dragonfly 7Pro all have built in GPS. Pay close attention to the unit you are buying, because if you are looking for built in GPS the standard Dragonfly 4 and Dragonfly 5DVS do not have that feature built in. You absolutely have to go Pro to make sure you get the GPS you’re looking for.
There are a lot of good reasons to make sure your fish finder has GPS built into it, with the biggest being improving your fishing techniques and mapping all the data you could want as a fisherman. Each of these options have some great benefits to them, so pick the one that is in the right price range for you! A good rule of thumb is the more you pay, the better mapping options you are going to get, so please remember this if that is an important feature for you!
Early sporting fathometers for recreational boating used a rotating light at the edge of a circle which flashed in sync with the received echo, which in turn corresponded to depth. These also gave a small flickering flash for echos off of fish. Like today's low-end digital fathometers, they kept no record of the depth over time and provided no information about bottom structure. They had poor accuracy, especially in rough water, and were hard to read in bright light. Despite the limitations, they were still usable for rough estimates of depth, such as for verifying that the boat had not drifted into an unsafe area.
Just getting started using a fish finder? Know the basics but want to get more out of your fish finder? Not sure you’re reading your fish finder display correctly? Don’t worry, we’re here to help. This short tutorial will teach you how to make sense of your fish finder display so you can tell what’s a bait fish, what’s a trophy catch and what’s just a submerged tree that you’ll snag on. Take just 7 minutes to go through this tutorial and at the end you’ll be able to read your fish finder display for:
Harpoons are spears which have a barb at the end. Their use was widespread in palaeolithic times.[11] Cosquer cave in Southern France contains cave art over 16,000 years old, including drawings of seals which appear to have been harpooned. Tridents are spears which have three prongs at the business end. They are also called leisters or gigs. They feature widely in early mythology and history.
ONE SMALL STEP FOR MAN, ONE GIANT LEAP FOR PADDLING_KIND: In the 2009 ICAST article, I mentioned a combo system that was in the new products exhibit, but wasn't available at the time of the show. It's most certainly available now, and that unit is the Humminbird 385CI. Like us, fish seek comfort, safety, and food. This unit will allow you to gather "data" that you can process in to fish finding "information".

When compared to other finders, this screen is relatively small, but it still gets the job done. Since it’s in full color and has high contrast, you can still see everything quite clearly. The only downside is that you have to switch between menus, which can be a problem if you are trying to find fish and mark your location. Overall, it’s not necessarily a deal breaker, but it may be enough to warrant a larger screen. Fortunately, the Striker can come in bigger sizes if you want to upgrade.


For just around 600 you can get this Raymarine Dragonfly fish finder that offers features that are usually found on much pricier models. It uses next-gen CHIRP technology that gives photo-like imagery with high resolution structure. The CHIRP technology transmits a wide spectrum of frequencies and the result is a much higher resolution. The generous size (5.7 inches) of the display gives an easy read of the underwater details and the 1600 nits gives clear viewing even in bright daylight.
There are a lot of good reasons to make sure your fish finder has GPS built into it, with the biggest being improving your fishing techniques and mapping all the data you could want as a fisherman. Each of these options have some great benefits to them, so pick the one that is in the right price range for you! A good rule of thumb is the more you pay, the better mapping options you are going to get, so please remember this if that is an important feature for you!
There are a lot of good reasons to make sure your fish finder has GPS built into it, with the biggest being improving your fishing techniques and mapping all the data you could want as a fisherman. Each of these options have some great benefits to them, so pick the one that is in the right price range for you! A good rule of thumb is the more you pay, the better mapping options you are going to get, so please remember this if that is an important feature for you!
The use of the hook in angling is descended, historically, from what would today be called a "gorge". The word "gorge", in this context, comes from an archaic word meaning "throat". Gorges were used by ancient peoples to capture fish. A gorge was a long, thin piece of bone or stone attached by its midpoint to a thin line. The gorge would be fixed with a bait so that it would rest parallel to the lay of the line. When a fish swallowed the bait, a tug on the line caused the gorge to orient itself at right angles to the line, thereby sticking in the fish's gullet.
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