The CHIRP sonar that is built into this model is second to none in terms of performance, and always gives you a clear picture and measurement of the floor and surface beneath your boat, as well as the location of the fish around it. Another feature that we really enjoy about this Humingbird fish finder is that it comes with a built in SD card slot so that you can save your favorite waypoints to it. You can even upload additional maps to your software using the SD card feature.
By calculating the amount of time between when the sound wave was sent and when it bounced back, it measures the distance and shows it on the screen. If the wave doesn’t encounter anything on its way, it reaches the bottom. If the bottom is soft and it’s just mud and weeds, the signal gets absorbed. A rock bottom will reflect a stronger signal back.

Standalone fishfinder: If you just want to see what’s below, dedicated fishfinders give the biggest display and the most performance for the least cost. If you have a small boat that you use for fishing small inland lakes or are on a limited budget, a standalone fishfinder is for you. Conversely, if your pilothouse has room for multiple displays, or if you just bought a new GPS, get a serious big-screen fishfinder. You can usually add a GPS sensor later to many units, turning them into chartplotter combos.
Hockey tape was made for the ice, and even though hard-water anglers are looking for a different kind of score, they should always have a roll on hand. A few wraps around the butt and foregrip of any jigging rod immediately improves the hold and comfort, but hockey tape can be used on any ice tool. If you’ve ever had the cheap rubber handle cover disappear from your ice scooper, you know the feeling of metal freezing to a glove or the burning sting of touching it with your bare hand. A few wraps of hockey tape can easily fix that. Should your bibs or jacket get hooked or ripped, the hockey tape will keep a tear from getting worse until you can make a permanent repair.
Paddling.net has always given me plenty of room to not only discuss paddle fishing things, but other worldly things as well. So, with colder weather upon us and fewer fishing opportunities available, I figured I might as well take full advantage of that luxury and devote an installment to those "other" things. You know, like politics, religion/faith (the huge difference between them), family, crime/punishment, and why Kiss still isn't in the rock and roll hall of fame.
Bait: If you're not using live bait or cut bait, you'll want to use artificial bait or lures. Most artificial lures resemble the type of bait fish or other food, such as worms or shrimp, that the fish you're trying to catch normally eat. These artificial baits can be scented and have metal spoons attached to them or be painted in metal flake to reflect light in the water. Other types of bait include jigs and jig heads, spoons, flies and spinnerbaits, which you can attach artificial or real bait to, and attractants to make artificial lures smell lifelike.
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