When compared to other finders, this screen is relatively small, but it still gets the job done. Since it’s in full color and has high contrast, you can still see everything quite clearly. The only downside is that you have to switch between menus, which can be a problem if you are trying to find fish and mark your location. Overall, it’s not necessarily a deal breaker, but it may be enough to warrant a larger screen. Fortunately, the Striker can come in bigger sizes if you want to upgrade.
Unless you know where fish are lurking, casting out anywhere on the water doesn’t necessarily guarantee a bite. Finding where the hot spots are will help you save time and money while fishing. That’s where fishfinders come in. An essential part of any modern angler’s arsenal, a fishfinder makes catching more fish easier.  Fishfinders help you pinpoint the honey hole using SONAR so you can see where the fish are and at what depth they are hiding. No more wasting time, tackle or line on deserted spots in the water. From standalone units, fishfinder/GPS combos, networked or multi-function displays, West Marine offers a wide array of fishfinders from the top brands on the market today. Keep reading for tips on finding the right system for your boat.
The common earthworm is a universal bait for fresh water angling. In the quest for quality worms, some fishers culture their own worm compost or practice worm charming. Grubs and maggots are also considered excellent bait when trout fishing. Grasshoppers, flies, bees and even ants are also used as bait for trout in their season, although many anglers believe that trout or salmon roe is superior to any other bait. Studies show that natural baits like croaker and shrimp are more recognized by the fish and are more readily accepted. A good bait for red drum is menhaden.[5] Because of the risk of transmitting whirling disease, trout and salmon should not be used as bait.
Power output is measure in watts, often represented by the “W” symbol. With more power you’ll get clearer, more-accurate readings, and you’ll be able to find fish in deeper water. Units with limited power won’t always send the signal out far enough and you can get poor quality images. Look closely for a good power output and frequency options. The right combination can help you choose the right unit, based on overall ability. You’re looking for balance of depth, power and clarity of image.

The side scan will scan much more around the boat but are not as effective, especially in deep water. For this reason alone, you may feel the need to buy two seperate fish finders but some premium models have both side and down scanning capabilities. This means you can usually view both at the same time for a very detailed scan around the boat in all directions.
The power of a fishfinder—the strength of the “ping”—is expressed in watts RMS (root mean squared). Power is directly related to how well you see in silt-laden water, view down to greater depths, and successfully resolve separate targets and bottom structure. A 500-watt (RMS) fishfinder should have plenty of power for most coastal applications. Serious bluewater anglers should look for 1,000 watts or more. Inland lake fishermen can see the shallow bottom with only 200 watts.

For deep-water fishermen, and those who spend much of their time angling in open water, a GPS is essential. When you are far from landmarks and familiar sight-lines, your chances of success can be much better when you can return to that favourite spot. Commercial-fishing pros understand this as well as anyone, which is why they invest in quality GPS equipment.
2. Save numerous locations and data for accurate and successful fishing next time out – You navigate quickly and accurately to your top fishing spot, then save the locations so you can return to them later. Reduction in physical size has been accompanied by massive increases in computer memory, so you can have the information on numerous locations ready to use every time you go, no matter where you go.
These sonar reflections will also display on the screen. So this way a fishfinder reads and lets you view the bottom and everything it encounters in between. The angle of the sonar beam is measured in degrees and it’s called the cone angle. A wider angle covers more area underwater. Different fish detector models come with different cone angles. Some models also include multi-beam sonar technology that allows covering a much wider area.
Higher frequency transducers have shorter wavelengths and more wave cycles per second, which means you can visualize more details (smaller fish) but have only shallow to moderate depth capacity. One sound wave at 200kHz is slightly longer than 1/4", so a 200kHz sound wave will be able to detect fish as short as a quarter of an inch. A 200kHz transducer has a range of only about 600'. High frequency provides a crisp, clear picture of the bottom with the tradeoff of less depth range. For best resolution, choose 800kHz or 455kHz transducers.
For those who want the ultimate in fish finding technology, we have the Lowrance HDS-9 as a top rated fish finder. Not only do you get a large screen, but it’s touch activated for even more convenience. It’s so wide that you can chart two maps at once, and it’s all high-definition which allows you to create 3D models of the bottom of any lake or river in real time. Overall, this is as good as it gets.

Gear up from Cabela's for the fishing trip of a lifetime! No matter what type of fishing you enjoy, Cabela's offers a large selection of quality and dependable fishing supplies. Shop online today for fishing rods, reels, or rod & reel combos. Whether you enjoy fly-fishing, saltwater fishing or are just learning to fish, Cabela's has all the gear you need from the top brands.
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